Basil – Thai Siam Queen

R30.00 incl VAT

For cooks, this quick-growing basil should be a staple for the kitchen garden. It has a more pungent flavour than most basil and is used in Thai, Indian and Italian dishes. It also produces pretty burgundy flowers, and green and burgundy leaves. 

The seed is very small and fine so sow carefully in trays or, if you’re feeling brave, in situ. Let the sun do its thing and bring those fragrant leaves to life. Pinch out the new leaves to make the plant bushy and thus more leafy. 

Eventually the plants will produce pretty white flowers that the bees love – but at the same time the leaves may become less flavourful, even bitter. To slow the inevitable, remove the flower heads and give your plants a light pruning to encourage the plant to produce new growth for you to enjoy.  As the season comes to an end, the flowers will take over, and this is an opportunity for you to let the plants go to seed. Collect and save for next year. And take some cuttings for a pot on a sunny sill through winter.

Did you know? Thai basil plays a prominent role in south-east Asian cuisine. It is also known as Thai holy basil or tulasi/tulsi in India where is grown for culinary, medicinal and religious purposes.

Description

For cooks, this quick-growing basil should be a staple for the kitchen garden. It has a more pungent flavour than most basil and is used in Thai, Indian and Italian dishes. It also produces pretty burgundy flowers, and green and burgundy leaves. 

The seed is very small and fine so sow carefully in trays or, if you’re feeling brave, in situ. Let the sun do its thing and bring those fragrant leaves to life. Pinch out the new leaves to make the plant bushy and thus more leafy. 

Eventually the plants will produce pretty white flowers that the bees love – but at the same time the leaves may become less flavourful, even bitter. To slow the inevitable, remove the flower heads and give your plants a light pruning to encourage the plant to produce new growth for you to enjoy.  As the season comes to an end, the flowers will take over, and this is an opportunity for you to let the plants go to seed. Collect and save for next year. And take some cuttings for a pot on a sunny sill through winter.

Did you know? Thai basil plays a prominent role in south-east Asian cuisine. It is also known as Thai holy basil or tulasi/tulsi in India where is grown for culinary, medicinal and religious purposes.

Additional information

Weight .25 kg
Dimensions 20 × 10 × 3 cm